Concussion Awareness and Return to Play Guidelines

It is Georgia Storm’s policy to require that all parents/legal guardians of youth players, along with all registered youth coaches, be informed on the subject of concussive injury to players and on the best practices available for diagnosis and treatment for this potentially serious medical condition. Georgia Storm members are required to follow all Federal, State, and local legal requirements including, but not limited to, the removal from play of any youth player suspected to have had a severe head injury of any type. Georgia Storm wants all participants including parents, game officials, coaches, assistants, directors, and club administrators to be cognizant and on the alert for all potentially serious types of injuries.

Concussions, also referred to as traumatic brain injuries (TBI), are particularly dangerous to the youth athlete as the brain is still undergoing significant growth up to and during the teenage years. Please note, that Georgia Storm alerts parents/guardians at every registration with an electronic acknowledgment form to the dangers of concussions and other brain injuries. Georgia Storm is committed to the safety of all players. And always remember that “When in doubt, sit them out!”

What Is a Concussion?

A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury—or TBI— caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or by a hit to the body that causes the head and brain to move quickly back and forth. This fast movement can cause the brain to bounce around or twist in the skull, creating chemical changes in the brain and sometimes stretching and/or damaging the brain cells.

Concussion Signs

  • Appears dazed or stunned
  • Is confused about assignment or position
  • Forgets an instruction
  • Is unsure of game, score, or opponent
  • Moves clumsily
  • Answers questions slowly
  • Loses consciousness (even briefly)
  • Shows mood, behavior, or personality changes • Can’t recall events prior to hit or fall
  • Can’t recall events after hit or fall

Concussion Symptoms

  • Headache or “pressure” in head
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Balance problems or dizziness
  • Double or blurry vision
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Sensitivity to noise
  • Feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy, or groggy
  • Concentration or memory problems
  • Confusion
  • Just not “feeling right” or is “feeling down”

If there is a possibility of a concussion

A player diagnosed with a possible concussion may return to soccer activities only after their parent or guardian provides a signed authorization to the coach or Georgia Storm director.
  1. Remove the athlete from play.
  2. Keep an athlete with a possible concussion out of play on the same day of the injury and until cleared by a health care provider. Do not try to judge the severity of the injury yourself. Only a health care provider should assess an athlete for a possible concussion.
  3. Record and share information about the injury, such as how it happened and the athlete’s symptoms, to help a health care provider assess the athlete.
  4. Inform the athlete’s parent(s) or guardian(s) about the possible concussion and refer them to CDC’s website for concussion information.
  5. Ask for written instructions from the athlete’s health care provider about the steps you should take to help the athlete safely return to play. Before returning to play an athlete should:
    • Be back to doing their regular school activities.
    • Not have any symptoms from the injury when doing normal activities.
    • Have the green-light from their health care provider to begin the return to play process.

Downloadable Resources - CDC downloadable resources

CONCUSSION FACT SHEET FOR PARENTS

HOJA INFORMATIVA PARA LOS PADRES

CONCUSSION FACT SHEET FOR PARENTS

HOJA INFORMATIVA PARA LOS DEPORTISTAS Y SUS PADRES ACERCA DE LAS CONMOCIONES CEREBRALES

CDC’S HEADS UP – INJURY BASICS